Tag internet

Reach Women by Reaching Moms

In the wake of my post yesterday on the stumbles and ultimate demise of Merlin Media’s FM News 101.1, this piece by Maryanne Conlin at MediaPost’s Engage:Moms blog seems prescient.

While many brands shy away from using Mommy bloggers or targeting digital moms because “they aren’t our target,” what I have found is that entrepreneurial mom bloggers have developed services that segment the mom market to a surprising degree. For a recent effort with a gourmet food product, we found reaching out to both top Foodies, as thought-leaders for gourmet cooking, and to “Mom Foodies” — the ones who would really end up buying the bulk of the product, was effective in not only drawing press (Foodies) but also Facebook Likes, Twitter Fans and all those great Pinners (moms).

Merlin set out originally to program an all-news station for women. I wonder if they ever thought about how to find out what that audience cared about.

(h/t @markramseymedia)

5 Fresh Digital Media Trends to Watch

5 Fresh Digital Media Trends to Watch

Broadcast’s Strategic Advantage Over the Internet

Gunnar Garfor nails it when he writes:

… the Internet cannot cope when a lot of people want to watch or listen to something at exactly the same time. That is why broadcasting was invented. A broadcaster (owning TV channels or radio stations) send the signals out in the air, and EVERYONE in the coverage area can receive the signal, even if EVERYONE means 300 million or a billion people. And because telecom operators are trying to lobby governments around the world into taking frequencies from broadcasters, handing them to telecom operators so that there will be more bandwidth for wireless Internet. If they succeed, there will be a shortage of available frequencies (space to broadcast) for broadcasters. The victims will be viewers and listeners not able to receive their favourite TV or radio programmes.

The next time you hear someone pronounce the death of broadcast under the heel of wi-fi, 3G, 4G, Wi-Max or any other IP technology, remind them of this problem.

the Internet cannot cope when a lot of people want to watch or listen to something at exactly the same time. That is why broadcasting was invented. A broadcaster (owning TV channels or radio stations) send the signals out in the air, and EVERYONE in the coverage area can receive the signal, even if EVERYONE means 300 million or a billion people. And because telecom operators are trying to lobby governments around the world into taking frequencies from broadcasters, handing them to telecom operators so that there will be more bandwidth for wireless Internet. If they succeed, there will be a shortage of available frequencies (space to broadcast) for broadcasters. The victims will be viewers and listeners not able to receive their favourite TV or radio programmes.