Tag marketing

Making Money: Advice for Small Businesses

Jason Fried is co-founder of 37signals, software company that specializes in web-based collaboration applications for small businesses. In this article in Inc, he writes about some of the fundamental lessons he’s learned about making money and how they apply to small businesses:

So here’s a great way to practice making money: Buy and sell the same thing over and over on Craigslist or eBay. Seriously.

Go buy something on Craigslist or eBay. Find something that’s a bit of a commodity, so you know there’s always plenty of supply and demand. An iPod is a good test. Buy it, and then immediately resell it. Then buy it again. Each time, try selling it for more than you paid for it. See how far you can push it. See how much profit you can make off 10 transactions.

Start tweaking the headline. Then start fiddling with the product description. Vary the photographs. Take some pictures of the thing for sale; use other photos with other items, or people, in them. Shoot really high-quality shots, and also post crappy ones from your cell-phone camera. Try every variation you can think of.

(via kottke)

Learning from Justin Bieber?

Guy Kawasaki wrote a piece at the American Express OPEN Forum entitled, “What We Can Learn from Justin Bieber.” The title will likely give you pause, but in the piece, he really explores some of the tremendously effective ways that Bieber has used a combination of social media and old-fashioned hard work to become the phenomenon that he is today. So you if don’t want to spend the ten bucks to go see Bieber’s new movie, then you can read this piece and learn something.

Five Trends for the Future of Radio

Jim Kerr at Triton Digital Media put together five trends that he sees emerging at the convergence of traditional methodologies and digital extensions. The one that I find most compelling from where I sit was the first on his list:

1. Gathering and organizing listener data becomes priority one

While radio has historically been about broadcast, at the center of current digital development, from mobile to social media to streaming to advertising, is the unique user. That disconnect will start to be addressed by broadcasters in 2011. Gathering, identifying, and communicating with radio listeners at a one-to-one level will be the centerpiece of radio’s — indeed, all of media’s — future.

The listener database is going to be critical … If you don’t know who your listeners are, they aren’t going to matter.

I think one of the most critical tasks that broadcasters face is to embrace the ability to drill down to specific end users and tell your story to them, exactly where they live. The days of assuming and estimating audience preferences and tastes are gone. Listeners regularly share this information already with Facebook and other social media platforms. Radio broadcasters need to recognize the strategic value of developing a strong database of listener information and then use it effectively.

Watch or listen to Mark Ramsey’s conversation with Jim Kerr here.

1. Gathering and organizing listener data becomes priority one

While radio has historically been about broadcast, at the center of current digital development, from mobile to social media to streaming to advertising, is the unique user. That disconnect will start to be addressed by broadcasters in 2011. Gathering, identifying, and communicating with radio listeners at a one-to-one level will be the centerpiece of radio’s — indeed, all of media’s — future.

Where is Groupon Going?

Frank Sennett wrote a lengthy profile of Groupon founder Andrew Mason in Time Out Chicago. Groupon is one of those marketing phenomenons that seems to have crept up quietly during the emergence of Facebook and Twitter. The comparisons to Amazon and eBay seem apt at this point, but the real question seems to be, “What’s next?”